org.apache.shiro.session.mgt
Interface SessionContext

All Superinterfaces:
Map<String,Object>
All Known Subinterfaces:
WebSessionContext
All Known Implementing Classes:
DefaultSessionContext, DefaultWebSessionContext

public interface SessionContext
extends Map<String,Object>

A SessionContext is a 'bucket' of data presented to a SessionFactory which interprets this data to construct Session instances. It is essentially a Map of data with a few additional type-safe methods for easy retrieval of objects commonly used to construct Subject instances.

While this interface contains type-safe setters and getters for common data types, the map can contain anything additional that might be needed by the SessionFactory implementation to construct Session instances.

USAGE: Most Shiro end-users will never use a SubjectContext instance directly and instead will call the Subject.getSession() or Subject.getSession(boolean) methods (which will usually use SessionContext instances to start a session with the application's SessionManager.

Since:
1.0
See Also:
SessionManager.start(SessionContext), SessionFactory

Nested Class Summary
 
Nested classes/interfaces inherited from interface java.util.Map
Map.Entry<K,V>
 
Method Summary
 String getHost()
          Returns the originating host name or IP address (as a String) from where the Subject is initiating the Session.
 Serializable getSessionId()
           
 void setHost(String host)
          Sets the originating host name or IP address (as a String) from where the Subject is initiating the Session.
 void setSessionId(Serializable sessionId)
           
 
Methods inherited from interface java.util.Map
clear, containsKey, containsValue, entrySet, equals, get, hashCode, isEmpty, keySet, put, putAll, remove, size, values
 

Method Detail

setHost

void setHost(String host)
Sets the originating host name or IP address (as a String) from where the Subject is initiating the Session.

In web-based systems, this host can be inferred from the incoming request, e.g. javax.servlet.ServletRequest#getRemoteAddr() or javax.servlet.ServletRequest#getRemoteHost() methods, or in socket-based systems, it can be obtained via inspecting the socket initiator's host IP.

Most secure environments should specify a valid, non-null host, since knowing the host allows for more flexibility when securing a system: by requiring an host, access control policies can also ensure access is restricted to specific client locations in addition to Subject principals, if so desired.

Caveat - if clients to your system are on a public network (as would be the case for a public web site), odds are high the clients can be behind a NAT (Network Address Translation) router or HTTP proxy server. If so, all clients accessing your system behind that router or proxy will have the same originating host. If your system is configured to allow only one session per host, then the next request from a different NAT or proxy client will fail and access will be denied for that client. Just be aware that host-based security policies are best utilized in LAN or private WAN environments when you can be ensure clients will not share IPs or be behind such NAT routers or proxy servers.

Parameters:
host - the originating host name or IP address (as a String) from where the Subject is initiating the Session.
Since:
1.0

getHost

String getHost()
Returns the originating host name or IP address (as a String) from where the Subject is initiating the Session.

See the setHost(String) JavaDoc for more about security policies based on the Session host.

Returns:
the originating host name or IP address (as a String) from where the Subject is initiating the Session.
See Also:
setHost(String)

getSessionId

Serializable getSessionId()

setSessionId

void setSessionId(Serializable sessionId)


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